September 29, 2011
This image depicts the structure of the recently shut-down Kelihos botnet -
The following  excerpt explaining Kelihos’s take-down comes from Securelist, where you can read a more detailed and fascinating report on Kaspersky Labs role in the botnet takedown:
Kelihos is Microsoft’s name for what Kaspersky calls Hlux. Hlux is a peer-to-peer botnet with an architecture similar to the one used for the Waledac botnet. It consists of layers of different kinds of nodes: controllers, routers and workers. Controllers are machines presumably operated by the gang behind the botnet. They distribute commands to the bots and supervise the peer-to-peer network’s dynamic structure. Routers are infected machines with public IP addresses. They run the bot in router mode, host proxy services, participate in a fast-flux collective, and so on. Finally, workers are infected machines that do not run in router mode, simply put. They are used for sending out spam, collecting email addresses, sniffing user credentials from the network stream, etc. A sketch of the layered architecture is shown below with a top tier of four controllers and worker nodes displayed in green.

This image depicts the structure of the recently shut-down Kelihos botnet -

The following  excerpt explaining Kelihos’s take-down comes from Securelist, where you can read a more detailed and fascinating report on Kaspersky Labs role in the botnet takedown:

Kelihos is Microsoft’s name for what Kaspersky calls Hlux. Hlux is a peer-to-peer botnet with an architecture similar to the one used for the Waledac botnet. It consists of layers of different kinds of nodes: controllers, routers and workers. Controllers are machines presumably operated by the gang behind the botnet. They distribute commands to the bots and supervise the peer-to-peer network’s dynamic structure. Routers are infected machines with public IP addresses. They run the bot in router mode, host proxy services, participate in a fast-flux collective, and so on. Finally, workers are infected machines that do not run in router mode, simply put. They are used for sending out spam, collecting email addresses, sniffing user credentials from the network stream, etc. A sketch of the layered architecture is shown below with a top tier of four controllers and worker nodes displayed in green.

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